17 6 / 2014

In the July 2012 issue of ASBMB Today, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay profiled ASBMB member Mike Snyder and how he got his mother to help him out with his research endeavor in personalized genomics.

In the July 2012 issue of ASBMB Today, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay profiled ASBMB member Mike Snyder and how he got his mother to help him out with his research endeavor in personalized genomics.

13 5 / 2014

In the December 2012 issue of ASBMB Today, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay explored the controversy over a recommendation by the American Heart Association to eat a certain amount of omega-6 fatty acids was helping or harming Americans.

In the December 2012 issue of ASBMB Today, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay explored the controversy over a recommendation by the American Heart Association to eat a certain amount of omega-6 fatty acids was helping or harming Americans.

15 4 / 2014

The first issue of ASBMB Today launched in April 2002.

The first issue of ASBMB Today launched in April 2002.

18 3 / 2014

In a March 2012 Q&A with Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay, Paul Fraser, an associate editor of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, talked about his love for sailing.

In a March 2012 Q&A with Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay, Paul Fraser, an associate editor of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, talked about his love for sailing.

18 2 / 2014

In her JBC Reflection, Christine Guthrie says she was “adrift” in one point of her career.

In her JBC Reflection, Christine Guthrie says she was “adrift” in one point of her career.

14 1 / 2014

The first issue of the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics launched in January 2002.

The first issue of the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics launched in January 2002.

17 12 / 2013

As part of the ASBMB/JBC centennial celebration in 2007, “Publish or Perish,” adapted from W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan’s popular opera “The Mikado,” was performed.
The performance depicted the travails of a much-rejected author who finally succeeds in publishing in the JBC. Along the way, he encounters numerous personages, such as the Editorial Board, the fearsome Associate Editor and the meddlesome Lord High Copy Editor, who has a long list of victims.  
Jack Preiss adapted the music, and John Exton adapted the words.

As part of the ASBMB/JBC centennial celebration in 2007, “Publish or Perish,” adapted from W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan’s popular opera “The Mikado,” was performed.

The performance depicted the travails of a much-rejected author who finally succeeds in publishing in the JBC. Along the way, he encounters numerous personages, such as the Editorial Board, the fearsome Associate Editor and the meddlesome Lord High Copy Editor, who has a long list of victims.  

Jack Preiss adapted the music, and John Exton adapted the words.

19 11 / 2013

In the May 2012 issue of ASBMB Today, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay profiled prominent biochemist Robert Schimke, who began a second career as an artist.

In the May 2012 issue of ASBMB Today, Rajendrani Mukhopadhyay profiled prominent biochemist Robert Schimke, who began a second career as an artist.

30 10 / 2013

It’s Scary Science Week! In this 1989 paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers reported finding in vampire bat saliva an activator of plasminogen, which is the precursor to plasmin, an enzyme needed to busts up blood clots. Of course, if you’re a vampire, you don’t want clots between you and your next meal. Isolation, characterization, and cDNA cloning of a vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator: http://www.jbc.org/content/264/30/17947.full.pdf+html Photo credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Desmodus.jpg
October 30, 2013

It’s Scary Science Week! In this 1989 paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers reported finding in vampire bat saliva an activator of plasminogen, which is the precursor to plasmin, an enzyme needed to busts up blood clots. Of course, if you’re a vampire, you don’t want clots between you and your next meal.

Isolation, characterization, and cDNA cloning of a vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator:
http://www.jbc.org/
content/264/30/17947.full.pdf+html


Photo credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/File:Desmodus.jpg

October 30, 2013

28 10 / 2013

It’s Scary Science Week!  Today we offer a gem from a 1910 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Talk about a gripping intro: “Certain conditions under which strychnine has been found in an exhumed body considerable time after death seem worthy of record. On November 15, 1909, a man fifty-three years old died under suspicious circumstances.”  Read the paper: http://bit.ly/HmvKu9 Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/savagecats/5421980723/
October 28, 2013

It’s Scary Science Week!

Today we offer a gem from a 1910 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Talk about a gripping intro: “Certain conditions under which strychnine has been found in an exhumed body considerable time after death seem worthy of record. On November 15, 1909, a man fifty-three years old died under suspicious circumstances.”

Read the paper: http://bit.ly/HmvKu9

Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/
photos/savagecats/5421980723/

October 28, 2013

17 10 / 2013

This week on Throwback Thursday: We celebrate the discovery of Vitamin C!  Earlier this week, America celebrated Columbus Day, remembering explorer Christopher Columbus. One of the biggest challenges for explorers like Columbus was scurvy, which for centuries was one of the major scourges of sailors.  Though the protective effects of citrus against scurvy were well-known starting in the 18th century, it was not until 1932 that Charles Glen King published a seminal paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry that described the chemical structure of vitamin C, proving once and for all that it was the factor responsible for prevention of scurvy.http://www.jbc.org/content/97/1/325.full.pdf
October 17, 2013

This week on Throwback Thursday: We celebrate the discovery of Vitamin C!

Earlier this week, America celebrated Columbus Day, remembering explorer Christopher Columbus. One of the biggest challenges for explorers like Columbus was scurvy, which for centuries was one of the major scourges of sailors.

Though the protective effects of citrus against scurvy were well-known starting in the 18th century, it was not until 1932 that Charles Glen King published a seminal paper in the Journal of Biological Chemistry that described the chemical structure of vitamin C, proving once and for all that it was the factor responsible for prevention of scurvy.

http://www.jbc.org/
content/97/1/325.full.pdf

October 17, 2013

15 10 / 2013

The first issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry launched in October 1905.
Oct 15, 2013

The first issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry launched in October 1905.

Oct 15, 2013

10 10 / 2013

This week on Throwback Thursday: We celebrate a century of ASBMB Nobel Laureates! Check out past ASBMB members who have won science’s ultimate prize: http://www.asbmb.org/Page.aspx?id=2636 Then read all about this year’s winners in Physiology and Medicine:http://wildtypes.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/cool-photos-of-winners-of-2013-nobel-prize-in-physiology-or-medicine/
October 10, 2013

This week on Throwback Thursday: We celebrate a century of ASBMB Nobel Laureates!

Check out past ASBMB members who have won science’s ultimate prize: http://www.asbmb.org/
Page.aspx?id=2636

Then read all about this year’s winners in Physiology and Medicine:
http://wildtypes.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/cool-photos-of-winners-of-2013-nobel-prize-in-physiology-or-medicine/

October 10, 2013

03 10 / 2013

For the first Throwback Thursday of the month, we celebrate the birthday of the Journal of Biological Chemistry! The first issue was published in October 1905.
October 3, 2013

For the first Throwback Thursday of the month, we celebrate the birthday of the Journal of Biological Chemistry! The first issue was published in October 1905.

October 3, 2013

22 9 / 2013

This week on Throwback Thursday: We honor the achievements of Richard Scheller and Thomas Südhof, co-winners of the 2013 #Lasker Basic Medical Research Award. The duo was recognized for their “discoveries concerning the molecular machinery and regulatory mechanism that underlie the rapid release of neurotransmitters.” Working independently, Scheller and Südhof identified the individual structural components of the cellular machinery responsible for membrane fusion, and then teased out the molecular mechanisms that underlie the process. In this classic 1994 paper from the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Scheller’s group discovered that the docking proteins Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-1 (VAMP-1) and synaptophysin directly interacted during the membrane fusion process, primarily at neuronal synapses, a process which they presciently noted “has import at either a spatially or temporally distinct stage of synaptic vesicle trafficking.”http://www.jbc.org/content/269/40/24534.full.pdf Further elucidating the process of neurotransmitter release, a 2000 Journal of Biological Chemistry paper from Südhof’s group examined the role of vesicle SNARE core complexes in the regulation of synaptic vesicles and uncovered “distinct pathways in the regulation of release for different neurotransmitters.”http://www.jbc.org/content/275/36/27703.full?sid=ff20c6a1-9faa-492f-b7c5-7e9602d53392

September 22, 2013

This week on Throwback Thursday:

We honor the achievements of Richard Scheller and Thomas Südhof, co-winners of the 2013 #Lasker Basic Medical Research Award.

The duo was recognized for their “discoveries concerning the molecular machinery and regulatory mechanism that underlie the rapid release of neurotransmitters.” Working independently, Scheller and Südhof identified the individual structural components of the cellular machinery responsible for membrane fusion, and then teased out the molecular mechanisms that underlie the process.

In this classic 1994 paper from the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Scheller’s group discovered that the docking proteins Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-1 (VAMP-1) and synaptophysin directly interacted during the membrane fusion process, primarily at neuronal synapses, a process which they presciently noted “has import at either a spatially or temporally distinct stage of synaptic vesicle trafficking.”

http://www.jbc.org/
content/269/40/24534.full.pdf

Further elucidating the process of neurotransmitter release, a 2000 Journal of Biological Chemistry paper from Südhof’s group examined the role of vesicle SNARE core complexes in the regulation of synaptic vesicles and uncovered “distinct pathways in the regulation of release for different neurotransmitters.”

http://www.jbc.org/content/275/36/27703.full?sid=ff20c6a1-9faa-492f-b7c5-7e9602d53392
September 22, 2013